Thursday, June 7, 2012

Cape Farsight--the most complete incompleteness.

In my imagination I see things so vividly. The places in my books are alive and I could take you on a tour of my dream-worlds. Last night as I lay in bed my mind kept drifting over to Cape Farsight, India, home of the Seasoning children. I hadn't thought of this book of mine for a long time, being too absorbed in my other books. But you know when a book is good. You know it because you can't forget it.
As I drifted off to sleep I took a mental tour of the Cape and all the dear places I grew to love so well. It's strange how vividly I see it all--almost as if I've been there before. I was pleased to see how well I remembered each path under the shady trees and each turning of the dusty-dim road.
I can see the Seasonings' little bungalow--the front walk covered over in exotic vines, the large window looking into the dining room. The rooms are low and cool and shady--a blessed relief from the heat outdoors. I can see Derrydock in the distance, and I know (because I have walked it many times in thought) the way to the marketplace. You turn right out of the Seasonings' gate, pass a grove of low trees, cross a dusty foot-bridge, and you are in the market, socializing with Dharma and smelling all the thousand and one scents pervading the air there.
On the other hand, if you take the left branch out of the gate, you will come to Miss---oh blast. I forgot her name.--well anyway, you come to her house and then continue on. Pretty soon, taking a bit of a right-ward veer you will happen upon the Green in the center of the village, and on the other side of that Green is the Ladies' Club where the OLAF meet.
All of it is right there in my mind and I can see it and hear it and smell it and I know it. Cape Farsight is as real to me as any place in this world. Because I've spent a whole novel there. I met my characters there, and I do believe it will always stay with me because it holds the esteemed place of being my first novel I was satisfied with. I do hope to introduce you to it someday, and I do hope I have been able to describe it so you can see it as I do. At any rate, I hope someday to see Cape Farsight...I'll let you know when I find it. :)
P.S. I'm thinking of re-naming the book: The Mother-Hunt. What do you think? :)

13 comments:

Anne-girl said...

Oh no! Please keep the old title! So nice and homey! "The mother hunt" reminds me of "the witch hunt" from King Solomon's mines.

Rachel Heffington said...

I had thought of changing it because I didn't think "A Mother for the Seasonings" would capture anyone's attention--publisher, agent, or otherwise. It sounds rather drab, I though. "The Mother-Hunt" sounded a bit more mysterious...do you have any other ideas?

Morgan said...

Aww! I love the Seasonings! I was privileged to read the early stages!:)

Morgan said...

Does that mean I get a signed copy when it comes out?:)

Hope's Treasures said...

Wow I felt like I had been to your characters little town, I love how you describe things.
Do you always see the surroundings so vividly ?
blessings
Rachel Hope

Rachel Heffington said...

@Morgan, of course dear! And I *have* decided to change the name to The Mother Hunt. It's a recurring theme in the book (*of course*) and is much more marketable. :D
@Hope, not *always* but generally by the end of a book I have a purty good idea of what my place looks like. Though I do have to work at forming that image. :)

Sarah said...

Wait!!! What?! You're going to seriously sell it as "The Mother Hunt"??? :\ I dunno...I kinda agree with Anne-girl on this one....

Maria Tatham said...

Rachel, I like this post very much. You may be 'missing the mark' though by changing your lovely title. Is there some way to use the other as a subtitle?

Rachel Heffington said...

Well, I've decided *against* that title for the name of the book, but I am still thinking of changing from such a long, tongue-tying title as "A Mother For The Seasonings." Plus, it states a little *too* blankly what the whole business is about.

Horse Lover said...

Since you asked what we think, I think that "The Mother-Hunt" sounds . . . sinister. "A Mother for the Seasonings" is much more charming and I would be much more inclined to pick up a book titled the latter rather than the former.

Morgan said...

I agree with the others. I like "A mother for the seasonings" much better:)

Rachel Heffington said...

But does it sound interesting? I mean, I know it sounds homey, but would homey sell? :P I'm trying to think like an editor here, and it's boggling my mind. :D

Maria Tatham said...

Yes, homey sells big-time. Think of 'the Beloved Mitford Series' by Jan Karon. Its first book (on my to read list) is "At Home in Mitford." Bout as homey as a writer can get.

If your book is homey, Rachel, and its title is too, you're properly targeting an agent or publisher, and your audience.

You have time to consider this a little more? Don't rush this necessarily.

Best wishes!